The Rotator Cuff’s role in the throwing motion is to center the humeral head of the shoulder in the socket of the scapula.

The muscles of the Rotator Cuff (RTC) and the muscles that attach the shoulder blade Rotator-Cuff-2(scapula) to the rib cage control the position that the shoulder stays in during every phases of the throwing motion.  Each muscle plays an important part in stabilizing the shoulder as the athlete transitions from one phase of the throwing motion to the next. The ability to dynamically stabilize the shoulder in each phase, especially the two phases where most injuries occur, requires strength and useable flexibility. The contractions of the RTC and shoulder are both concentric (shortening) and eccentric (lengthening).  Training the RTC the right way is the only way to give athletes the chance to perform at their peak level and avoid unnecessary injury.  This is why we feel it is so important to perform RTC exercises correctly.

We started the OAI to return athletes to the field performing better than they were prior to their injury.

When we investigated the programs we found on the Internet we were surprised to see the lack of emphasis on RTC training specificity.  We want athletes to perform to the best of their ability.  The only way that can happen is to stay on the field.  That’s why we are giving it away for free.  These exercises are used every day in our therapy clinics and at the OAI.

Our mission is to keep athletes safe and this is just one way we can prove it to you!

Electromyographic (EMG) studies have determined the peak muscle activity in the Cocking, Acceleration, and Deceleration Phases of the throwing motion required to center the shoulder in the socket. Scapulothoracic positioning during each of these phases is of paramount importance and is a multifaceted evaluation process. Mobility of the scapula around the rib cage must be assessed […]

Overhead Athletic Institute Ed Martel

3 Things That Lead To Breakdown And Inefficiency 1. Poor Mechanics-Video Analysis can only isolate mechanical breakdowns. 2. Poor Conditioning-Our FMS/BSFMA screen will isolate any kinetic chain limitations. 3. Poor Segmental Stabilization-Eliminates any chance of creating power efficiently. Analyzing video and maximizing the opportunity an overhead thrower has to create greater velocity requires more than […]

Our exercises are designed to increase the static and dynamic rotational stability of the entire kinetic chain throughout the various phases of the overhead throwing motion. Each exercise must be performed to perfection in order for them to have functional correlation to the physiological demands placed on the musculoskeletal system.  The exercises increase the elastic range […]

We understand at the OAI that every athlete throwing a ball wants more speed. We know that’s the primary reason young athletes are attracted to the websites available right now that promise immediate speed when you buy their program.  There is no easy way to increased velocity.  It requires repetition and hard work.  The programs […]

Overhead Athletic Institute - Direct Access - Ed Martel

In the state of Michigan and in 48 other states you now have direct access. As an athlete you can now go to a physical therapist and be evaluated and receive treatment without a script from a physician. This is a monumental benefit and cost saving piece of legislation that will help any athlete looking […]

Welcome to Overhead Athletic Institute: Medical Management and Performance Enhancement for Overhead Athletes The OAI exercise program is designed to address specific individual aspects of muscle activation, proximal stabilization, and RTC strength, each of which has been shown to contribute to efficient pitching mechanics. These exercises must be performed perfectly in order for them to be […]

Our bodies are biomechanical machines. The muscles are the engines that control the skeleton. We created the OAI to raise the level of understanding for players and coaches, as well as instructors, with regards to the musculoskeletal and physiological principals that rule and govern the throwing motion. Understanding how the body works and how to […]

The Rotator Cuff’s role in the throwing motion is to center the humeral head of the shoulder in the socket of the scapula. The muscles of the Rotator Cuff (RTC) and the muscles that attach the shoulder blade (scapula) to the rib cage control the position that the shoulder stays in during every phases of the throwing […]

Vf=Vi + At Final Velocity=Initial Velocity + Acceleration (Time) Final velocity is a product of initial velocity plus the acceleration force over a period of time. The longer you apply an acceleration force to the ball, the greater the final velocity. This correlates to stride length and amount of time the hand is in contact […]

There is a sequential reason why hard throwers have very similar aspects to their throwing motion. Not all throwing motions are the same, but close analysis reveals similarities within the individualized throwing motions that illuminate why hard throwers create effortless velocity. Generating speed and transferring speed throughout the body requires a perfectly timed kinematic sequence. […]

Static stability exercises must include proper positioning throughout the entire excursion of motion to have the intended physiological and stabilization effect. Deviation from the correct positioning defeats the purpose of the exercise. At the OAI we create more rotational stability and elastic range in your tissues to allow athletes to use the individual phases of […]

Today’s athletes are expected to be more specialized at a much earlier age. This is both good and bad. From the perspective of skill acquisition and the timing and repetition required to become or approach elite status, specialization may have a benefit. From the perspective of over-training and diversification of activity, early specialization may negatively […]

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Specificity of Types of Muscle Fibers Type IIB and Type IIA Muscle Fiber Types and Specificity Type IIB muscle fibers are fast twitch glycolytic and are the speed producers.  Type IIA muscle fibers are fast twitch oxidative and are intermediate speed producers.  Structured training has been proven to make our recruitment of muscle types more […]

The key to velocity is biomechanics. Each athlete is unique, but the formula for throwing the ball efficiently is the same.   Where you create velocity is a product of how you use your body throughout the individual phases of the throwing motion.  Understanding what to do and when needs to be understood and felt by […]

Long Toss has been used by many coaches and teams as a means to increase arm strength and endurance. There has never been any statistical justification or evidence based research study to support this anecdotal method of training. Long toss does more damage than good. Changing the angle of release for an overhead thrower alters […]

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Video Analysis is a vital and absolutely necessary component of performance evaluation. It is critical to recognize biomechanical faults or tendencies in a throwers technique and know what changes need to be made. Many websites offer video analysis of the throwing motion as part of their program and also offer suggestions as to what changes […]